See how spacious this seemingly narrow home feels - and pay special attention to the kitchen

If you like maple and walnut in the same package — isn't that a popular ice cream flavor? — then you will love this tiny house creation called The Riverside.
Built by Nashville, Tennessee, company New Frontier Tiny Homes, this 246-square-foot microshelter is an adaptation of a Tumbleweed Tiny House Company design, says builder David Latimer. With a modified floor plan, Latimer told us, "We built it and changed their original floor plan, chose every single piece of material, paint, appliance and finish."
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In the music industry, you would call that "Song by Tumbleweed; performance and arrangement by New Frontier." In this home, however, the stunning harmony is provided by a heavy reliance on smooth maple ply boards for walls and ceiling offset by a beautiful floor so full of light and dark walnut whorls (doesn't that sound like ice cream?) that it appears to be swimming in place.
That said, let's start the tour.
There's a lot to see in the shot above, but it's clear that the living area — the so-called great room — has a very spacious feel to it, enough to have a throw rug on the floor and a fold-up chair facing the couch. You can also get a quick understanding of the smoothness of the walls and ceiling and the quietude that creates — especially in contrast to that dizzily beautiful walnut floor.
In the distance, above the kitchen and nestled in a double dormer, is the bedroom loft. The home also features a small storage loft.
The home has granite countertops, a surface you find in elegant homes. Notice the balance the cabinetry and the wall racks provide for the window wall — the perfect antidote to any feelings of smallness.​
Here's the reverse view of the downstairs. In this photo, the white secretary on the right — holding the flower vase, books and lamp — is the perfect tiny house touch. It's out of the way, but practical as a nail gun.
Here you can see the entire downstairs without swiveling your head.
A closer view of the kitchen, which reveals the cabinet under the sink and the second kitchen window.​
This close-up of the storage loft (with the adorable window) clearly shows the beauty of the maple ply walls and ceiling. It also shows, albeit by inference, that the main portion of the house has no dormer, which means, while the loft is small, the room underneath it has a spacious feeling, given the height of the ceiling's peak.
The can is not exactly roomy, but space saved there means more space elsewhere, for example, for that terrific shower, which might even be big enough for two.
A great view of the bedroom with the A-shaped roof meeting up with the flatter roof of the two dormers.
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The loft is lined with windows, so there can be no lack of air movement or light up there, despite the lack of a portal behind the bed. Notice, too, the floor to the loft is not walnut, which might have made the bedroom appear smaller, given its darker accents.

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